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The language of England, widely used around the world as a language for business and communications.

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ndwieh asked for the first time
in English·
11h

In the document "The Concept of Discourse Community" by John Swales, the author delineates the defining criteria of a discourse community, emphasizing six characteristics that contribute to its formation. Swales asserts that a discourse community is characterized by common goals, participatory mechanisms, information exchange, community-specific genres, specialized terminology, and a high level of expertise. He provides examples and discusses the case of the Hong Kong Study Circle, highlighting the diverse membership and interactive content through its Journal and Newsletter. Additionally, Swales addresses the assimilation of world-view within discourse communities and the variability in their norms, citing academic classes as potential discourse communities as they evolve to meet the defining criteria over time.

Moreover, Swales challenges the notion of complete assimilation into a discourse community and discusses the varying degrees of belonging and participation within such communities. He acknowledges the potential for conflict and tension within discourse communities and explores the dynamics of participation and assimilation. Swales also evaluates the applicability of the concept of discourse communities to various groupings, such as shareholders of a company, members of book clubs, and academic classes, providing insightful perspectives on the formation and evolution of discourse communities.

In "Literacy, Discourse, and Linguistics: Introduction," James Paul Gee introduces the concept of Discourses, which encompass ways of being, valuing, believing, and doing. He emphasizes the multidimensional nature of Discourses and the influence they have on individuals' identities and behavior. Gee challenges the notion of complete assimilation into a single Discourse and argues that individuals are often influenced by multiple Discourses, undermining the idea of a clear-cut, all-or-nothing effect. He also explores the complexities of acquiring new Discourses and how individuals may not fully or perfectly embody a single Discourse, emphasizing the fluid and dynamic nature of Discourse membership.

Overall, both Swales and Gee provide thought-provoking insights into the formation and dynamics of discourse communities and the complex nature of Discourses, shedding light on the varied ways in which individuals engage with and are influenced by different linguistic and social contexts. 

Base on the lecture above respond to this questions "These questions are intended to get you thinking about how to comprehend the content and how valuable it is" 

1-What distinguishes a speech community from a discourse community?

2-Which six qualities best describe a discourse community?

3-What kind of discourse community does Swales propose as an example?

4-When Swales talks about assimilation problems in connection to a discourse community, what does he mean?

5-How can Swales help us with our research question for this course, in your opinion?



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aditijha answered this question

here is the reading:

The document "What Is It We Do When We Write Articles Like This . . ." by Michael Kleine delves into the intricacies of academic research and writing processes, employing a mix of narrative, empirical research, and reflective analysis. The document unfolds in a structured and reflective manner, beginning with Kleine's introspective nightmare vision of students in the library and culminating in pedagogical implications and questions for discussion. Through interviews with eight professors from diverse academic disciplines, Kleine seeks to understand their research and writing processes, emphasizing the recursive, personal, and rich nature of academic writing. He proposes a hunting/gathering model of the research-writing process, highlighting the heuristic nature of research and the need for genuine reading and diverse research experiences. Kleine advocates for building genuine research communities in classrooms and embracing flexible, resourceful approaches to writing across the curriculum. Ultimately, he underscores the transformative potential of writing and the importance of understanding what academic writers truly do.

Kleine's document is structured in a way that reflects the recursive and personal nature of academic writing. It begins with a vivid narrative of a nightmare vision in the library, setting the stage for the exploration of research and writing processes. Kleine then presents his pedagogical implications, advocating for a hunting/gathering model, genuine research communities, and flexible, resourceful approaches to academic writing. Throughout the document, Kleine weaves in reflective insights from his own academic writing process, emphasizing the transformative and knowledge-generating potential of writing.

The central theme of the document revolves around the complex, recursive, and personal nature of academic writing. Kleine's emphasis on the heuristic nature of research and the need for genuine reading and diverse research experiences underscores the richness and diversity of academic writing processes. Furthermore, his advocacy for building genuine research communities in classrooms and embracing flexible, resourceful approaches to writing across the curriculum underscores the transformative potential of writing. Ultimately, Kleine's document offers a nuanced understanding of academic writing and research, emphasizing the need for genuine inquiry, flexible approaches, and the transformative power of writing.In summary, Michael Kleine's document "What Is It We Do When We Write Articles Like This . . ." offers a reflective, introspective, and insightful exploration of academic research and writing processes. Through narrative storytelling, empirical research, and reflective analysis, Kleine underscores the recursive, personal, and transformative nature of academic writing. His advocacy for flexible, resourceful approaches and the transformative potential of writing underscores the rich and diverse landscape of academic writing processes. 


Now the guidelines:In response to Michael Kleine's inquiry, "What is it we do when we write articles like this one -- and how can we get students to join us?" please provide your response.These are intended to encourage reflection on both the text's meaning and your comprehension of it.
 Here are the questions: 

1-What distinguishes a hunter from a gatherer when performing research?

2-What does it mean to look for patterns in sources and to sort through them rhetorically?

3-For Kleine, what constitutes a "genuine research community"?

4- What does it mean to extend an invitation to students to take part in various research projects?

5-How can Kleine help us with our research question for this English course, in your opinion?

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